Archive for the 'Tennis News' Category
Tennis Rules Simplified

The rules of tennis are quite simple. The game itself is complex. "

Rule 1. Opponents stand on opposite sides of the court. The player who delivers the ball to start the point is called the server. The player who stands opposite and cross-court from the server is the receiver.

Rule 2. The right to serve, receive, choose your side, or give the opponent these choices is decided by a toss of a coin or racquet. If the choice of service or receiver is chosen, the opponent chooses which side to start.

Rule 3. The server shall stand behind the baseline on the deuce court within the boundaries of the singles court when playing singles and within the doubles sideline when playing doubles. All even points are played from the deuce court and odd number points played from the advantage court. The server shall not serve until the receiver is ready. Serves are made from the deuce court to the opponents service box on the deuce court. Advantage court to advantage box. If the server misses his target twice, he loses the point. If the ball hits the net and goes in the correct service box, another serve is granted. If the server steps on the baseline before contact is made, the serve is deemed a fault.

Rule 4. The receiver is deemed ready if an attempt is made to return the server’s ball. The receiver can stand where he likes but must let the ball bounce in the service box. If the ball does not land in the service box, it is deemed a fault and a second serve is given. If the ball is hit by either opponent before the ball bounces, the server wins the point.

Rule 5. The server always calls his score first. If the server wins the first point, he gets a score of 15. Scoring is done like a clock. See example below. Love means zero in tennis. The second point is called 30. The third point is called 45 (now-a-days known as 40) and game is won when the score goes back to love. If the score is 40-40, also known as deuce, one side must win by two points. Advantage-In means if the server wins the next point, he wins the game. Advantage-Out means the receiver has a chance to win the game on the next point.

LOVE 15-30-40

Rule 5. After the game, the opponents serve. Games equal 1. The first to win 6 games, by two, wins the set. The first to win 2 sets wins the match. If the score is 6-6, a tie-breaker is played. This is scored by one’s. The first team to score 7 points winning by two wins the set. The tiebreaker continues until one side wins by two. Hence, Game-Set-Match.

Rule 6. If the ball goes into the net, or outside the boundaries of the court, the player who hit that ball loses the point. If the ball hits the net during the point and goes into the opponents court, the ball is in play. A player loses the point if he touches the net, drops his racquet while hitting the ball, bounces the ball over the net, hits a part of the surroundings such as the roof, or a tree, the ball touches him or his partner, he deliberately tries to distract the opponent.

Rule 7. A let is called during the point if a ball rolls on the court or there is a distraction from someone besides the players on the court.

Rule 8. A ball that lands on the line is good.

Rule 9. If players serve out of turn or serve to the wrong person or court, the point or game will stand and order will be resumed following the point or game.

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Get that first serve in!

Question:
Why do commentators go on and on about first serve percentages?

Well, they do it because the serve is arguably the most significant shot in modern tennis. Typically, in a match between two pros, the server has a better win/loss ratio when the first serve goes in. So it’s important that it does go in! The first serve percentage is obviously used as an indicator of a player’s effectiveness in this area.

OK - it’s a significant factor in the pro game. Is it significant for us?

You bet it is! Apart from anything else, repeatedly using two serves per point is tiring, especially in the course of a long match. You can ill afford to waste the energy! You should be looking to get 60 - 70% of first serves into play.

Missing your first serve means there’s pressure on you to get your second serve in, and this pressure can start to affect your confidence over time. As a match progresses, a good returner will apply more pressure by moving in on the second serve and looking to attack you. So you find that it’s not enough to just get the second serve into play - it’s got to have a reasonable amount of depth and penetration as well. This added pressure can lead to double faults.

So if you’re missing your first serves, put a bit more spin on (for control) and get those percentages up again.

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Simon beats Moya in BCR Open final

BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) -Gilles Simon of France won his second straight BCR Open Romania by beating Carlos Moya 6-3, 6-4 in Sunday’s final.

The second-seeded Simon broke the Spaniard at 3-2 in the first set and saved all six break points he conceded in the match to secure his fifth career title.

The final only lasted about 90 minutes, just half the time it took Simon to defeat eighth-seeded Jose Acasuso of Argentina in Saturday’s semifinal. Simon beat local favorite Victor Hanescu in last year’s final, and has an 11-1 record in Bucharest.

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French Duo Devilder-Mathieu Outlast Top Seeds For Title


French duo Nicolas Devilder and Paul-Henri Mathieu won an epic battle against top seeded Poles Mariusz Fyrstenberg and Marcin Matkowski 7-6(4), 6-7(9) 22-20 in the final of the BCR Open Romania in Bucharest on Saturday to clinch their first team title.

Devilder and Mathieu won three points less than their opponents and saved six match points before prevailing on their 10th opportunity after 1 hr., 58 min. They upset No. 3 seeds Michael Mertinak, who was the defending champion (w/Marach), and partner Filip Polasek in the first round and knocked out 2005 champions Jose Acasuso and Sebastien Prieto in the semifinals.

“This is kind of a surprise for us,” confessed Devilder. “We came here focusing on our singles matches and end up winning the doubles. It feels great to win the title here."

Mathieu added: “It was very cold during the match and the conditions were a bit crazy. I don’t even know how many match points we had. The match was very close at end and I’m happy we made it."

Ranked No. 466 and No. 140 respectively, Devilder and Mathieu had not won a match in their two previous tournaments together and both have now collected their first ATP doubles titles after contesting just their first finals.

Fyrstenberg and Matkowski won the Bucharest title in 2006 (d. Garcia-Horna) and were looking for their eighth ATP title from their 18th final. This season they finished runners-up at Barcelona (l. to Bryan-Bryan) before clinching their home country title in June at Warsaw (d. Davudenko-Schukin).

The Poles are closing in on a spot at the season ending Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai, having entered the week at No. 9 in the Stanford ATP Doubles Race, 41 points back of South Africans Jeff Coetzee and Wesley Moodie in the seventh spot.

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A Tennis Racket Can Make Or Break Your Game

Tennis RacketYou are in love with the game of tennis and can not get enough of it. Starting off in school learning to play on basic gym equipment was the beginning-then in college you made sure that you took tennis as your required physical education classes.

The time has now come for you to get your own personal equipment and you want to get a tennis racket of your very own. To make a personal statement to everyone that you have come of age, are serious about this sport, and want to compete with your friends evenings and weekends.

What type of tennis racket are you going to purchase? They vary in length, weight, and head size, and you will need to figure out which one is the best for you. Think back to your beginnings playing this sport-what did you like or dislike about the different tennis rackets you used. This can be a starting point to begin narrowing down your choices.

A very important component for the tennis racket is the head size as the power behind your swings is directly affected. A larger head will give you with more power than a small head and also provides you with a larger hitting area making it a little easier to hit the ball. Generally speaking, a smaller racket head appeals to more accomplished players seeking more control, while larger rackets appeal to beginning and intermediate players seeking more power and a larger head.

They range in length from 27-29 inches with most people selecting the 27 inch ones. However, a longer handle provides more reach on ground strokes, adds leverage on serves, and slightly more power, than one with a standard length.

The weight has also been reduced making them lighter and easier to hold.
If you have friends or co-workers that also play, ask them about the type they use and why. They will enjoy talking to you about the sport and in providing you with information and advise. And, there is nothing more flattering than to ask someone for their opinion on a topic that they really enjoy and believe that they are an expert in.

Some of these people might even loan you some of their equipment so that you can try it out and find out whether or not you like it. No matter what your preference for a tennis racket is, you have to find the best one that meets your needs. This may even mean renting them and testing them out for a few games. This is probably the best way to have an opportunity to use many different types, styles, models and different manufacturers without spending a lot of money on ones that will just end up collecting dust in the closet.

Get out and play every weekend. The exercise is good, you will meet new people, and be out in the fresh air. This is much better than spending your weekend sitting in front of the television or going to the office to catch up on work.

Enjoy yourself, life is too short.

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